Here's what a week on the Galapagos looks like

Postbox ( Floreana Island, The Galapagos ). An old tradition of writing postcards to loved ones still continues. After writing a postcard, you leave it here for a fellow traveller to pick up and hand deliver to your recipient for you. In return, you go through the piles of postcards searching for one closest to your next destination that you can deliver for whoever has left it there. Some postcards take years to arrive, others take months. 'A lovely young German couple' hand delivered our postcards to our excited parents before we had even arrived home. 

Postbox (Floreana Island, The Galapagos). An old tradition of writing postcards to loved ones still continues. After writing a postcard, you leave it here for a fellow traveller to pick up and hand deliver to your recipient for you. In return, you go through the piles of postcards searching for one closest to your next destination that you can deliver for whoever has left it there. Some postcards take years to arrive, others take months. 'A lovely young German couple' hand delivered our postcards to our excited parents before we had even arrived home. 

We spent our last night of the cruise on the main island of Santa Cruz. 

We went to a bar for a few drinks with the captain, navigating the conversation with varying levels of spanglish. 

We got to know each other a little better (some more than others), carrying on to the local discoteca, empty except for Galo who had swapped his tan uniform for tight jeans. 

Tequila bottle in hand, shots all around, dancing to what would become the South American sound track of 2017. 

The night ended in suitable style with a nudey jump from the top deck of The Anahi.

Galapagos Tortoise can weigh over 400kg. ( Reserva El Chato, Santa Cruz, The Galapagos)

Galapagos Tortoise can weigh over 400kg. (Reserva El Chato, Santa Cruz, The Galapagos)

Everyone was rather demure at breakfast that last day on board, pretending they’d seen nothing in the light of the moon the night before and we spent a hangover afternoon visiting the Tortoise Sanctuary on Santa Cruz.

Leaving the cruise behind, we organised to dive with hammerhead sharks from Santa Cruz, before spending our last week on Isabella Island.  

The hammerheads are out at Gordons rock, a choppy watered place known for having strong currents.

The day we set out was a little overcast, which only added to the ominous vibe created by the school of hammerheads that cruised the ocean floor, their elongated heads and shadowy bodies moving deft and swift below us. 

Los Tuneles  (Isabella Island, The Galapagos)

Los Tuneles (Isabella Island, The Galapagos)

The current was stronger on the second dive. I remember hanging onto the rocks, gripping the rough edges with my hands and watching a tiny sliver of blood curl its way through the water and disappear. 

Thinking of the hammerheads, wondering if they could sense that. 

On Isabella Island we ate a lot of beach side dinners, sat in low chairs in the sand munching on popcorn served with the freshest ceviche. 

We celebrated Hadeys birthday with cheap drinks, a reenactment of Dirty Dancing and a suitable midnight ocean swim.  

Hasta Luego Galapagos  (Isabella Island, The Galapagos)

Hasta Luego Galapagos (Isabella Island, The Galapagos)

We snorkelled with sharks smaller than we'd seen on the cruise and found the tiny Galapagos seahorse with his tail curled around an underwater plant.  

We saw manta-rays gliding over the waters surface, the span of their wings so wide and prominent I thought they were shark fins cutting through the choppy water.

We looked for the penguins but for some unknown reason, they were missing when we were there.

We heard they returned a few weeks after we left, no one knowing the reason for their departure, nor their return, but happy to have them back. 

We went to Los Tuneles at Cabo Rosa. These awesome tunnels were formed when lava platform collapsed into the sea. It created a rocky labyrinth of ocean water pools and caves that is full of marine life weaving its way through. 

The Galapagos seems at times like a liquid dream in my memory, a time when my senses were taken on a journey from the moment I got there to the moment I left. 

It was like stepping inside the pages of National Geographic. 

Every. 

Single. 

Day.

I cannot say anything more except

You gotta go.